Welcome

Lee JacobsonHi, my name is Lee.
I'm a developer from the UK who loves technology and business. Here you'll find articles and tutorials about things that interest me. If you want to hire me or know more about me head over to my about me page

Recent Posts

1st December 2016 at 10:09 · By Lee Jacobson

December 2016 Updates

Well, I should have made this post about a month ago. But I suppose better late than never, right?

I guess I'll start with saying I'm 26 now, which is... Strange. But it becomes less eventful every year. I was thinking earlier it's been 10 years since I left school, and how some of my friends who didn't go to college or university have been working for almost 10 years now. On the other hand, others I know have only recently left education, so it's quite interesting to reflect on how well people are doing in comparison.

As a general observation I think we probably put too much importance on the benefits of university in the UK. It seems a lot of people go into university with a hope that after 3 years things will just fall into place somehow. For a lot of people it only sinks in when they leave with £40,000 of debt and begin to realise how few jobs there are for someone with a Communications and Media Studies degree. Thinking about it now, this might be a good topic to write about at some point. I know quite a few people have issues with the education system in the UK, but I think it really all stems from a poor attitude and understanding of education in general.

With that being said, I have a huge list of topics I want to talk about here over the next few months.

Firstly, I have a number of things I want to get of personal stuff to get off my chest. I'm not sure I've openly spoken about it here, but I have a few personality traits (or disorders) which have always caused problems in my life. And while I'm not interested in complaining, I would like to make a case for not over looking the unique strengths and perspectives of certain individuals. Similar to what I attempted to do previously in my post, "In Defence of the Pessimist".

The second set of topics I want to write about are more casual startup-related type posts. I have a few different tips and tricks I've learnt over the last 10 years for people interested in startups. A lot of these things are really simple like how to set up up a basic eCommerce website with limited technical skill and money, or tricks to grow a site's traffic. With the lack of quality content out there on some quite popular topics I think it could be something worth doing. It's something I never felt comfortable writing about previously because I was worried I wasn't being unique enough or adding enough value, but as I mentioned in my last post I don't want to always be so critical of the content I post here.

Finally, I want continue these monthly updates with some more focus to each. Next month I'm planning to talk a bit about my experience working on eCommerce startups, and a little about one I'm working on currently. Hopefully I can give some pointers to where I've went wrong previously and some tips going forward.

But before that I'm planning to make a non-ramble post sometime this month. Until then, thanks for reading.

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27th October 2016 at 2:08 · By Lee Jacobson

The Project Spot

I started the The Project Spot during my second year of university as a place where I could write about the projects I was working on, things on my mind, and my personal development. However, over the last few years I've felt unable to write here unless I it was something completely original - and more to the point, something that's of use to others. I've told myself for a while now that if I write for myself then whatever I put out will have no real value, and if anything, I'll just be adding to the pile of useless content on the web.

But now I find myself in a position where I haven't updated this site for over a year, and while I've had things to say during that time I've felt like it wasn't useful enough to publish. I decided recently that I don't want to think like that anymore. I want to start writing more openly here without worrying so much about the standard of the content.

As the name implies this was meant to be primarily a place where I could talk about my projects, so from now on that's exactly what I'll be focusing on. I want to set myself the target of writing monthly updates about what I'm working on, and also what I've learnt during the month. And while these posts won't be written for anyone but myself, I'll try to find some moral and keep them as interesting as I can.

I think it would be good to have a place where I can set public targets and have public expectations of myself. If I say I'll be doing X over the next month but don't, I feel I need to publicly justify my choices will help me avoid making the wrong ones.

While I'll be focusing on writing about my projects, I also want to write about personal development and other topics that interest me from time to time too.

I plan to write my first update over the next few days with content going up at least monthly from then on.

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7th May 2015 at 16:25 · By Lee Jacobson

Ant Colony Optimization For Hackers

Originally proposed in 1992 by Marco Dorigo, ant colony optimization (ACO) is an optimization technique inspired by the path finding behaviour of ants searching for food. ACO is also a subset of swarm intelligence - a problem solving technique using decentralized, collective behaviour, to derive artificial intelligence.

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Recent Tutorials

7th May 2015 at 16:25 · By Lee Jacobson

Ant Colony Optimization For Hackers

Originally proposed in 1992 by Marco Dorigo, ant colony optimization (ACO) is an optimization technique inspired by the path finding behaviour of ants searching for food. ACO is also a subset of swarm intelligence - a problem solving technique using decentralized, collective behaviour, to derive artificial intelligence.

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24th March 2015 at 22:07 · By Lee Jacobson

Solving the Traveling Salesman Problem Using Google Maps and Genetic Algorithms

An ideal way to explore the potential of genetic algorithms is by applying them to real world data. Perhaps one of the easiest ways to do this is by using the Google Maps API to implement a solution to the traveling salesman problem.

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